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Tag: debugging

Oddities working with images in iOS

Angel G. Olloqui 14 September, 2012

For the last 10 days I have been working in a new library to check iOS images on runtime. I will make another post to explain it in a future, but today I wanted to remark some oddities that I found when working so tightly with the UIImageView class (it is funny that I haven’t realized on most these oddities after almost 3 years working with them)

UIImageView

UIImageView, as any other view in iOS, extends UIView. This characteristic would make everyone think that UIImageView have all the functionality and behave as any other view. However, there are some interesting considerations when working with this component:

Tags: ios, interface builder, images, agimagechecker, debugging, runtime

    

Advance debugging in XCode

Angel G. Olloqui 02 June, 2012

Today I am going to talk about advanced debugging techniques in XCode. I am not going to spend much time on explaining the different options that you can find in the IDE, how to set breakpoints, or stuff like that. You can find basic techniques in many resources on the Internet.
But before starting, I want to remark two things:
  • This is a real example, where the standard breakpoints and console outputs are not enough to detect where the bug is. I haven’t activated the Exception Breakpoint because this option sometimes destroys the only information we have of the stack trace. My suggestion is to give it a try, but if you can not find your bug with it then disable it and continue reading this post. You will find a different way of debuging and you need as much information as possible. 

  • There are many debugging techniques. Do not blame me if I am doing something in a way slightly more difficult or different to “your way”. It is not a guide of how to do it right, but how to get the information we need in some easy steps.
So, having said that, let's start!

Tags: xcode, debugging, tutorials, llvm